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STW & "Career Technical Education"

Arizona Career Technical Education
Delivery System Project Report, April 1, 2003
Joanna Kister, Consultant, Education and Workforce Development, Columbus, Ohio
Submitted to: Arizona Department of Education, Career and Technical Education Division
www.ade.state.az.us

Some key words/phrases cited in document:
Career clusters p. ii, v, x, 25, 33, 34, 36, 40, 64, 65, 66, 115, 136, 138, 152
Career pathways p. x, 35, 36, 63, 65, 74, 98, 107, 115, 116, 124
Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 p. 7, 8, 22, 44, 48, 57, 60, 72, 100, 107, 113, 124, 126, 127, 131, 144, 152,
Community based learning p. 67, 117,
Connecting activities p. 8, 25, 98

integrate...
academic and technical skills p. 40
academic and vocational education p. 25
academic content and skills p. 39
academic standards with challenging technical content p. 51
and contextualize employability skills p. 65
and serve Grade 10-14 academic and CTE skills p. 93
CTE into the mainstream of high school education p. xi, 138
instruction in academic and occupational courses p. 127
rigorous academics with knowledge and skills needed for careers p. 21
the Level II competencies into required academic courses p. 89
various career preparation components p. 128
vocational education p. 7
Youth, Perkins, and Apprenticeship p. 7

National Dissemination Center for Career and Technical Education (NDCCTE) p. 2, 30, 110, 111, 140, 141, 144, 151, 152, 153
No Child Left Behind (NCLB) p. 8, 149
SCANS p. 29, 66, 99, 151
School based learning p. 8, 54, 67, 98, 103, 114, 117,
School-to-work p. 8, 25, 34, 98, 99, 127, 146, 148, 151, 152
School-to-careers p. 27, 128, 157
Work-based learning p. 8, 16, 25, 44, 52, 58, 67, 70, 71, 72, 74, 75, 81, 98, 100, 101, 103, 114, 117
Workplace readiness p. 29, 48, 109, 128
Workplace skills p. 27, 33, 71, 91, 114

Here's an index of states (other than Arizona) that are discussed (note: there may be more page #'s than listed below):
Alabama p. 63, 65, 68, 69, 154
Arkansas p. 48, 63, 112, 124, 154
California p. 38, 127, 154
Connecticut p. 48, 112, 113, 125, 138, 147, 154
Delaware p. 133, 134, 154
Florida p. 42, 65, 68, 74, 113, 114, 125, 127, 128, 129, 136, 154
Georgia p. 65, 68, 113, 124, 136, 154
Idaho p. 27, 66, 154
Illinois p. 110, 154
Indiana p. 131, 154
Iowa p. 154
Kentucky p. 48, 74,127, 128, 154
Maine p. 128
Maryland p. 27, 63, 114, 115, 124, 140, 154
Massachusetts p. 110, 115, 125, 133, 134
Michigan p. 21, 36, 38, 115, 116, 124, 128, 137
Minnesota (references section only: p. 143, 144, 150)
Mississippi p. 48
Missouri p. 63, 131, 132, 146, 154
Nebraska p. 27, 63, 154
New Hampshire p. 63, 128
New Jersey p. 133
New Mexico p. 27, 128, 154
New York p. 48, 63, 111, 115, 124, 125, 128, 140
North Carolina p. 48, 64, 65, 67, 115, 124
North Dakota p. 64, 154
Ohio p. v, 48, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 106, 107, 110, 111, 118, 119, 120, 124, 128, 129, 133, 136, 137, 154
Oklahoma p. 48, 64, 98, 110, 111, 120, 121, 124, 140
Oregon p. 64, 99, 111, 121, 124, 128, 140
Pennsylvania p. 48, 122, 125, 132, 138
South Carolina p. 65, 99, 111, 122, 124, 127, 128, 136, 140
South Dakota p. 154
Texas p. 27, 64, 65, 66, 127
Utah p. 27, 48, 123, 125, 131
Virginia p. 46,123, 124, 125, 136
Washington p. 28, 33, 56, 61, 64, 65, 66, 124, 125, 138, 140
West Virginia p. 48, 127
Wyoming p. 130, 132, 154

Also see list of State Websites on page 154
Cited on page 20 of the report is this document:

Goals for Education: Challenge to Lead
Southern Regional Education Board | June 2002
http://www.sreb.org/main/Goals/2002_Goals_Report.pdf

Excerpt from Goals for Education, pdf pg 14:
Every student today and in the future will need the knowledge and skills that are generally taught now in the core battery of courses traditionally thought of as "college prep." That means every student - whether bound right after high school for a community college, university or the workplace.

Can all students master these courses? Our goal should be nothing less. This is a huge change. We have expected less from many students in the past. All the effort poured into earlier grades wonąt pay off if we continue to expect less of high school students.

That is not to say that high schools should offer only the core college-prep curriculum. Many students also need a well-crafted sequence of technical or career courses, backed by solid end-of-program and workplace examinations. But note that technical literacy also requires high-level English, math and science. Schools that didnąt remove low-level courses in the 1990s should remove them now.

Note: the so-called "college-prep curriculum" needs to scrutinized. See one parent's comments cited in Joe Esposito's Tangled Web (p. 30-31):

VI. First "Outcomes"

Cottage Grove High [Oregon] has now awarded its first such certificates. In June 1994 a young man by the name of Jay Tennison received his CIM, which listed on the left side what he had become, on the right what he could do.

He had allegedly learned to be the following: Involved Citizen, Quality Producer, Self-Directed Learner, Constructive Thinker, Effective Communicator, and a Collaborative Contributor. At the same time he had learned to do the following: Quantify, apply Math/Science, Understand Diversity, Deliberate on Public Issues, Understand Positive Health Habits. All this by the end of the tenth grade!

His mother, however, disagrees and posted the following commentary on an Internet loop.

[My son] has received his CIM, [see Appendix VIII] for which he has met the following standards: [as listed above on the certificate]. Of course he cannot diagram a sentence, conjugate a verb, construct proper sentences or spell (English is NOT taught at Cottage Grove High School.) He has not been taught Algebra I or II, Geometry or Trigonometry. He can, however work story problems from his Alice in Wonderland storybooks and tell his teacher how he "feels" about his story problems. (This is College Prep, Interactive Math). He is in his 12th year of school and has not studied Biology, Geography, Civics, English, etc. He spent an entire year in a World of Work class, based on the Dept. of Labor's SCANS report. He has written a resume, can read a phone bill, speak publicly, has been taught how to receive merchandise on a loading dock, work well in groups for group grades (no individual achievement is recognized) [See Appendix III], has studied Death, Dying and Suicide, gone to a mortuary to see how a dead body is processed, role played when to have sex and discussed what kind of protection to use ...

Folks, this program is NOT about academic reform. It is about getting these kids jobs, changing their values and teaching them NOT to rely on an outside authority to tell them right from wrong, and IT IS coming to your school soon. Remember, WE are your "pilot school." (p. 19)

"A key element of the school-to-work movement is the attempt to eliminate the notion that a 4-year college degree is the only track through which occupational success can be achieved. Instead, the evolving global economy will produce the need for highly skilled, technical workers to be employed in moderate to high wage occupations without requiring a college degree (Glover and Marshall, 1993; C. L. Smith & Rojewski, 1993)." [Emphasis added]

School to Work Legislation: Past, Present and Future, School-to-Work Task Force Report, August 1999. Center for Psychology in Schools and Education. www.apa.org

Center for Psychology in Schools and Education
How Psychology Can Contribute to the School-to-Work Opportunities Movement: Report of the School-to-Work Task Force Approved by *******

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